The ATS Refreshes Its Branding


The ATS, an organization focused on helping the world breathe, breathed new life into its branding in 2021. Building on a more than 115-year commitment to driving innovation in respiratory health, the Society introduced a refreshed mission statement in September alongside a new logo combining the physiology of the lung coupled with an aspirational vision for the organization.

“While the new logo helps convey a modern, energetic society, the rebrand is about more than that. It is about fostering collaboration between specialists in all aspects of respiratory diseases — from research to prevention to treatment — all to improve patient health. And it will help our members take advantage of myriad opportunities to learn, network, and advance their careers,” said ATS President Lynn M. Schnapp, MD, ATSF.

The rebranding includes organizing ATS activities around four pillars of respiratory health:

  • Leading Scientific Discovery
  • Transforming Patient Care
  • Impacting Global Health
  • Advancing Professional Development

All contribute to the ATS mission “to accelerate global innovation in the advancement of respiratory health through multidisciplinary collaboration, education, and advocacy” with an emphasis on collaborations among specialists in respiratory disease.

Lynn M. Schnapp, MD, ATSF
Lynn M. Schnapp, MD, ATSF

“The ATS has always evolved as an organization. We started as the American Sanitorium Society in 1905, in response to the tuberculosis epidemic. Our name has changed several times over the past century, and our focus has expanded to include pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine — in the Americas and around the world,” Dr. Schnapp said. “Now, we’ve updated our mission to reflect that broader focus.”

With more than 16,000 members, the ATS facilitates the development of clinical practice guidelines, publication of four peer-reviewed journals, advocacy for improved respiratory health around the globe, development of patient education and career development resources, and the annual International Conference.

The present-day ATS was founded as the American Sanatorium Association, focused on the prevention, control, and treatment of tuberculosis. In 1938, the organization was renamed the American Trudeau Society. The American Thoracic Society name was adopted in 1960. In 2000, the Society became independently incorporated as a 501(c)(3) organization. Previously the ATS was the medical section of the American Lung Association.

The Four Pillars of the ATS

Leading Scientific Discovery — The ATS is a leader in the fundamentals of respiratory science. Providing the most recent and relevant findings in cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, pharmacology, populations, and translational science, breathing and lung physiology (including ventilation/breathing). This commitment to research and discovery in science is the gold standard in the field.

Transforming Patient Care — ATS members set the highest standard for respiratory care and treatment of patients. The ATS is the leading source for clinical tools, practice guidelines, and best practices based on the latest research and innovation.

Impacting Global Health — The ATS drives positive, proactive change to improve public respiratory health and prevention on a local, national, and global scale. This applies to environmental issues such as air quality, climate change, exposure to contaminants, and potential manmade disasters, as well as contagious diseases and tobacco prevention. Robust research and risk awareness drive change to “help the world breathe.”

Advancing Professional Development — The ATS is a catalyst for the growth and development of health care professionals and practices. Education, networking, mentorship, funding, and career opportunities are essential to excel and advance.

Register for ATS 2023

Register today for the ATS 2023 International Conference! Don’t miss this opportunity to take part in the in-person conference, May 19-24 in Washington, DC. Join your colleagues to learn about the latest developments in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine.